Kontrolation 2.0

‘Oh, dear! Here he goes again, prattling on about rabbit holes and secret cabins – boring!’ All I can say is that this Old Boffer and his squeeze are excited and who’s writing this drivel anyway!


So, where were we? As I recall, the framework of the cabin was up, the roof was nearly complete, the external cladding was well under way and the crew kept getting interrupted by splendid feasts instead of getting on with the job. J and I had to come back home for a couple of days to get the car serviced and MOT’d. Then it was back to the place where our dreams were fast becoming reality. Here’s what we found . .


insulation, floor and internal cladding under way


starting to get some idea of how it will be when finished


looking east through the ‘square window’ – Play School fans will get it


canalisation work begins


. . and the plumbing


the amount of stuff is going down rapidly

Meanwhile, our demirci/blacksmith is about to give a culinary master class . .





works canteen – Turkish style

Next day we sloped off over the mountains to stock up from our favourite winery. When we got back . .


internal walls were up


. . and J is looking decidedly happy

Another day and . .


ceilings are up


fascias are fitted, and . .


Hasan the plumber is under there somewhere


and the cheerful chippies are . .


. . really cracking on

Over there, up the hill a bit and as far again, a digger has, throughout the day and late into the night, dug a trench, laid the pipe and back-filled to our own, personal supply of mountain spring water.



Hasan putting the finishing touches, including . .


. . his patent sand filtration system!


everywhere, finishing touches to the woodwork



The temporary steps that will be replaced by really old ones from a derelict building made from Juniper/Ardiç which, having survived longer than J and me, will almost certainly outlast us!

As we left for home again, there were still bits and bobs to finish off. Now we have a few days respite whilst the carpenters adapt the old doors/frames and build the kitchen cupboards, our bed and the windows and shutters. There is still the soba/oven/range to buy and fit but our new mattress and energy efficient fridge are just awaiting word for delivery. J is already packing boxes with stuff to take up there, including wine, whisky and rakı glasses – well, with a balcony looking out over that view, we deserve to be spoilt for choice as we toast yet another beautiful day in Turkey!

Alan Fenn, Okçular Köyü and the other end of the Rabbit Hole!



Alan, You Must Have Kontrolation

When J and I first settled here in Turkey, our good friend Emine taught me two valuable life-lessons. The first came when she observed me ‘go into one’ when faced with the Byzantine bureaucracy and my very first, totally disinterested bureaucrat – ‘Alan,’ she said, ‘you must have acceptation!’ The second occurred when I gave my instructions to a workman and then walked away naively assuming that he would get on with the work as directed. ‘Alan,’ came the admonishment, ‘ you must have kontrolation!’


These two aids to sanity and survival in Turkey have served J and me well over the years – we are, after all, only slightly abnormal and still hanging in here and having a whale of a time!

Anyway, back to the here and now . . those of you who have been following this irregular narrative of late will know that J and I are doing a bit of California Dreaming and having a cabin hideaway built in the mountains somewhere.

string theory

Knowing the way things work here and knowing that random questions arise at random times in line with the ‘Chaos Theory’ – or was it ‘String Theory’? lordy, it’s so hard to remember, we decided we needed to be around.

So, Saturday saw us up at 5 o’clock and back on site by nine, and it was a hive of activity. Timber being treated and steel framework sprayed – we dived backwards and forwards shopping for more nuts, bolts, screws and paint.



Lunchtime saw the whole crew driving over the mountains to the home of our demirci/blacksmith for a meal with his family and a surprise (for J and me) in the village of Akçaköy. Now, Akçaköy is an amazing place – on the outside it looks poor, poverty-stricken even. Photogenic in its dilapidation, it was the home of Fakir Baykurt. Born into poverty, Baykurt went on to graduate from the amazing Village Institutes and become one of the great authors and social agitators in modern Turkey. (if you don’t know about this wonderful exercise in social engineering then do, please, click on the last link) The village boasts a library and a population that reads, nine out of every ten students from this village graduate from university and all because of Fakir Baykurt.


Fakir Baykurt2

Fakir Baykurt

at some point I will do a post about the village and Fakir Baykurt

But I digress – apart from the wonderful meal that we all enjoyed, there was a surprise in store for J and me. Knowing how we love and treasure old things a deal was waiting to be struck between our blacksmith who wants to please his beautiful wife and his wife who hates the 60+ year old doors in their home and us who simply adored them from the moment we first saw them. A deal was done – wife gets the doors she desires and we get the doors of our dreams for our new cabin home.

cabin 3

at some point this will be the external door


and this and its mate the internal doors

Back on site, tea on, we await delivery of the roofing . .


the most important bit of kit on site

cabin 6

roofing delivered and paid for

Sunday was amazing! Apart from the usual ongoing work, our neighbour and all-round decent guy Ramazan turned up and set about organising our midday meal. (three) Chickens in a tin, baked spuds and onions, pickles and honey for afters! Look at these pics . .

cabin 7

cabin 8

40 minutes later (and you thought your new NEFF was the bee’s knees)

cabin 9

the guys with the scoff

cabin 10

luncheon is served

When the day’s work was done, we were invited back to the home of Irfen, our blacksmith cum project manager. What a delight to eat with the family in their kitchen before retiring to the salon where all manner of social issues were discussed. There is no doubt about the extent to which ‘village folk’ have a handle on world affairs. Our hosts were desperately disappointed that we declined to spend the night – we old farts needs our pills, toothpaste and clean underwear – another time, with a bit of planning!


Irfen’s sister (nurse), Irfen, his wife Ayşe and children, J, Mum, Dad

Thursday saw the internal metalwork completed and the carpenters moving ahead with cladding. Lunchtime we planned to take the crew to the beach pide/pizza place, When we got there we found that a young man working for the forestry had provided a meal for everyone who came to celebrate his wife’s survival as a pedestrian from an horrific road accident – he even paid for the drinks!! What an amazing place this country is. Tomorrow the car will be serviced  and Thursday is MOT day – we also need to fit in a lot of mundane stuff before heading back down the ‘Rabbit Hole’. Ain’t it great!

Alan Fenn, Okçular Köyü


Punched, Bored Or Countersunk!

A couple of posts back I put you in the frame about the secret hideaway at the other end of the Rabbit Hole that J and I had just acquired. In it you learned how quickly things can evolve here in Turkey if you have a good attitude backed by a fair wind. This post takes this little voyage of adventure a bit further forward as we pick up the Trade Winds and ride the rollers of good fortune. Enjoy the trip, we are – sort of – most of the time!

sailing the trades

I’m not being a grumpy old fart by voicing that, just saying that sometimes the pace of things can leave one gasping and spinning around rather like the effects of that first, illicit fag behind the bike shed.

Anyway, having sorted out and paid for the steel that will form the framework for our wooden cabin, we agreed with our usta/craftsman that we would come back for an inspection visit about halfway through this phase of the job. We arrived, parked up on our neighbour’s plot and, with great anticipation, stepped through the hedgerow for our first view . .

cabin trip 1

we both thought ‘Blimey, it looks like an apartment block!’

cabin trip2

side elevation

cabin trip4

checking the measurements – again!

cabin trip3

rooms with a view

Shortly after we arrived the head of forestry for the province turned up and introduced himself. He congratulated us on our project and then got into conversation with J who told him of our hopes and plans for the plot with fruit and nut trees and a ‘dragonfly’ pond. Such was her enthusiasm that the forestry department have offered to supply us with all the trees we need – free!

Next came lunch, a BBQ of a whole, roast lamb at the beach for everyone thanks to the father of our young usta. Also present, along with the forestry guys, were the village muhtar/headman and a provincial governor. A new project (nothing to do with us) to plant a forest of acacia trees to help the village with honey production was agreed. Turks really know how to network!


Acacia Honey – reputedly the best

Next day was pretty frenetic as we were taken to the forestry depot to pick out the wood we wanted for inside and outside the cabin. Then it was off to the showroom to choose shower, toilet and washbasin. That was followed up by various visits to select roofing material and insulation, rock-wool for walls and ceiling and a special type of foam for underfloor.  Oh, and before I forget, we managed to fit in a trip to Eğirdir Lake for a scrumptious meal with our main man and his wife – two people we love dearly.


that’s us, right by the little harbour

In the midst of all this mad activity, and my occasional outbursts of exasperation at my inability to keep so many balls in the air at once, was Sue. Sue is J’s long-time friend who has been on a two week visit that I’m sure she thought would be a calming and relaxing experience.

What can I say, Sue? I don’t know if I’m punched, bored or countersunk – join the club – ‘Burası Türkiye’ – ‘This is Turkey!’ Above all, never let anyone tell you that Turks are lazy or that you can’t get things done here – ever!

Alan Fenn, Okçular Köyü – this side of the Rabbit Hole!


(F)lights of Fancy

Life has become a bit of a distraction, and it’s rather nice! What with one thing or t’other I seem to be flitting between inconsequential jobs whilst what’s left of my mind goes walkabout or indulges in flights of fancy (which I’m told is a ‘really relaxing colouring book’ for adults).

f of f

My mental wanderings seem mostly to be focussed (in a misty sort of way) on the imminent start of the building of our cabin in the mountains at the other end of the rabbit hole. In an attempt to keep my feet on Terra Firma J has been keeping me occupied on lighter projects. She has always disliked the garden lights that were installed when the house was built. ‘They’re boring’, she was wont to say, ‘everyone has these!’ She wasn’t wrong – I’ve seen them all over the place in one variant or another.

Her propositions for change start something like this – ‘Don’t you think it would look wonderful if . .?’ or ‘What do you think about . . for an idea?’ And so it has been that for the past ten days or so I have been bringing some of her (f)lights of fancy from fluffy butterflies of wishful dreaming into solid manifestations made up of any old stuff that has been hoarded because it might be useful one day or was just lying about the place.

Old, handmade bricks, rocks from the mountains, plastic pipes, antique glass ‘windows’ from a hamam and bits of gaffer tape have taken on a new persona and really come into their own as night time falls. As they used to say on Blue Peter, ‘Here’s one I made earlier.’

Flight of fancy

by day

Flight of fancy2

and by night

Flight of fancy3

by day – a pile of rocks

Flight of fancy4

at night – still a pile of rocks!

Buoyed up by the success of her ideas J has started to collect things like ‘interesting’ tree branches, jam jars and the like. I have taken to locking myself in the workshop and sharpening chisels, plane blades, drill bits and doing other important stuff!

Whilst on the subject of lights and flights of fancy I really have to make mention of my sister. Despite my very best attempts she never, ever, forgets my birthday! Things have much improved from the days when I had to fly home with three concrete meerkats and a Christmas pud in my bag. These days, with the never-ending tide of electronic tat from China, she is able to pack dozens of items into one, lightweight parcel of pleasure! Here’s a little solar-powered garden light that has proved to be a real hit with some of the locals.

Flight of fancy5

Orthetrum coerulescens anceps – Keeled Skimmer

Flight of fancy6

Alan Fenn, Okçular Köyü


I Wouldn’t Leave My Little Wooden Hut For You-oo

Some of you will recall that J and I have been searching for a quiet, mountain bolt-hole for some while. About a year ago we discovered a secluded, little gem of an area – you can see some photos here and here. As is often the case with these things, there are pot-holes and swampy bits along the pathway to paradise. In this instance, we are talking about an area under special protection and the fact that the people who ‘own’ the land don’t! Although families had farmed the area for generations there were no formal title deeds. Ho-hum!

Two weeks ago we got a phone call from our under-cover secret agents suggesting that we get ourselves up to paradise toot sweet! A plot was up for sale in a perfect location, at a fair price and the owner had spent a lot of time and money to acquire title deeds! ‘Ferrets up a drain-pipe’ does not adequately describe our reaction time!


Next morning we were on site with our ‘agents’, the owner and really nice guy we’d met previously who happened to own and farm a plot next door to the one we were looking at.

The location was indeed perfect! 1200+ square metres, terraced, with a beautiful, mature pine tree, forest behind and to one side and a great view once the scrub has been cleared. Water for irrigation is free and drinking water is available. We made an offer there and then and by 3pm the next day the title deeds were in our hands. I’m already dreaming of creamy almond blossom scenting the garden in Spring and balmy evenings on the terrace listening to Segovia as he does his thing!



our view towards the lake

Now, this being a protected area, it is not possible to build a permanent structure – a bit of a puzzle you might think. Not really! The provincial roads department has a graveyard of those mobile office things that used to be all the rage.


The chassis is a massive C-section and there are four close-coupled wheels. With the office structure removed one of these would suit our needs perfectly, so we are acquiring one. With the platform area extended, it will hold a 7×4 metre wooden cabin (sans terrace) and if it’s got wheels it can’t be a fixed structure, can it? A modern solar electric system will power LED lighting and a fridge and ‘Bob’s your uncle!’


Access to the plot is via a narrow track that you’d miss if you didn’t know it was there. Here is the digger arriving to do a job of levelling and scrub clearing.


This being the back of beyond, the machine arrived more than an hour late (normal) and, as soon became apparent, with an operator that hadn’t got a clue which lever did what! The real operator had gone to a funeral and didn’t want us to be disappointed! Never mind, another day will do, we don’t need much of a reason to be back here again asap.


he managed to extend the arm before admitting he hadn’t got a clue

– our neighbour was not impressed!

The locals are just as nice as our neighbours here in Okçular – salt-of-the-earth! Out of the blue J and I were told to make our way to our plot-neighbour’s house on the edge of the village.


our plot is way over the other side

The house has fabulous views across the lake and set out on the upstairs terrace was a feast to welcome us to the community. I know we are going to be very happy living part of our time here.



Finally, an interlude whilst we await developments . .

Alan Fenn, Okçular Köyü and ‘I’m-Not-Telling-You-Where-It-Is’ Köyü