'Burası Türkiye!' 'This is Turkey!'

Flushed!

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Yesterday, you may recall, ‘Shit Happened!‘ Today? Well, today is another day!

This morning we both felt a tad moribund. The need to go to the loo being counteracted by the chipped lip of the plastic paint bucket that was filling the toilet role (such a way with words). The garden beckoned but the prospect of no water for five days, and no rain forecast either, had us reluctant to plant seeds and, instead, wandering around the garden hacking viscously at baby thistles and the like!

Meanwhile, after the visit yesterday by the Forestry people and the Jandarma, all was quiet on the Western front. The monster was also moribund – but more so.

Five days was looking more like five months, five years or maybe never! The Forestry people were back in some force with much coming and going. Enveloped in our ever more dense cloud of pessimism a small miracle occurred. Our neighbour Sadık arrived in his battered old Tofaş (an old-style Lada by any other name) with a great coil of water pipe tied on the roof. Knowing our situation, and being our plumber, he had taken it upon himself to get us sorted one way or another. Within twenty minutes water was flowing!

Sadık, a true neighbour, a squire and a gentleman!

This wonderful fellow has sorted a temporary arrangement that will see us through until the situation at the source is finalised. And finalising it (to paraphrase Capt Oates) may be some time!

Once Sadık left, again refusing payment, ‘We can sort it all later.’ (you recall he repaired the ravages of winter on the watering system), the Big Nobs arrived in force. The Forestry Chief for our province arrived with various Deputy Chiefs in one of those very intimidating 4x4s. We haven’t seen him for over a year when he donated a wad of trees for our garden. It was great because he was so interested to see what we had achieved since his last visit. The pond was a smash hit as were all the trees and J’s garden and compost heaps got special attention. Then they were off to assess what our new neighbour had been up to with his hired digger. Such a site visit by such high-flyers does not auger well for him.

And so it proved. What he has ordered done is totally illegal and he must answer for it before a judge. The owner-driver of the digger machine has had his machine and low-loader impounded and it will be parked outside our village muhtar’s office until there is a resolution by the judge. I don’t know if the driver has been charged but the loss of income alone will be devastating. A clear warning to others to ensure that, before you half pull a mountain down and fill a ravine and water course, what you are doing is legal!

So, life is pretty much back to normal and our moribund has done a bunk!

Alan Fenn, flushed and showered too!

ps after 20 years and a lot of political upheaval folk still ask us what it is that binds us to Turkey – the answer is all around us – Turks!

pps the Forestry Dept has undertaken to gift us a bunch of lavender plants – special delivery expected some time soon.

'Burası Türkiye!' 'This is Turkey!'

Shit Happens

. . to misquote Donald Rumsfeld.

We wandered back up here to the cabin today. The plan was to catch up on how the garden has been doing since we were last here two weeks ago when J planted a whole load of stuff. It’s been cold up here, here is a photo posted by our neighbour yesterday.

Not only has it been snowing but there was the ominous sound of a digger at work near where we source our spring water for the cabin. We should have gone to check what was going on right away, but we didn’t. An hour later and all that was coming out of the taps was a gurgle!

We girded our loins and set off to investigate. Seems some local has bought this particular bit of ravine and decided to pull the mountainsides down to create a flat area. In the process the digger has ripped out our pipe, ‘disappeared’ the filtration system and may well have done in the water supply to the beach cafe and another of our neighbours.

It’s ironic really because over-winter the garden watering system suffered some freeze damage and had only just been repaired!

I know, I know! This is not how it is and it’s just some ‘cock-up’ pic from the internet that I’m using for effect. But you know and I know that when people hire in blokes with diggers there is a disaster just waiting to happen. Guaranteed!

Anyway, when we pointed out the end of our ripped up pipe the patron said he was just as shocked as we were. He has assured us that it will all be sorted and we’ll be back in business within five days! Well, that’s what he said!

I’m not so sure because a short while ago the Forestry Technical Services people arrived together with a minibus full of Jandarma. Work has now stopped and the technical guys are remeasuring to ensure that all is as it should be. Our plumbing neighbour is well on top of the job and says he’ll get us fixed up with a temporary arrangement until things are sorted properly.

Meanwhile, we are stocking up on big bottles of water from the spring around the lake and an old bucket has been pressed in to service as we revert to the time honoured boating practice of ‘bucket and chuck it’! Always remembering, of course, to empty the contents down wind!

a finely crafted example of the basic shipboard item

As it says in the header of this blog ‘Burası Türkiye! This Is Turkey!’

Alan Fenn, re-enacting the life style pre-Thomas Crapper.

 

 

Stuff

From One Day To The Next

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The British will tell you that the dis-United Kingdom doesn’t have a climate it has weather! Much the same seems to hold up here in the mountains where weather comes and goes with a randomness induced by these very same mountains. The locals tell us that the two ends of the lake have different weather – when it’s raining there it’s sunny here – and we are only talking a handful of kilometres.

Between the ‘weather’ we admire the beauty of the masses of wild almonds that are in bloom. They grow everywhere in the hedgerows and at the edges of fields and leave the impression that we are in the middle of a candy floss forest.

J has been beavering away on her vegetable plot adding peas, beans, potatoes, coriander, parsnips, Swiss chard, parsley and cabbage to the onions and garlic planted earlier. A new plot has been cleared and made ready for melons, tomatoes, etc. Now we just have to hope that the wild pigs don’t decide to pay a visit!

In the process of plot preparation J was delighted to find that we will have some of the amazing Rhinoceros Beetles for company. If these wonderful creatures interest you here’s a link to a post I did a couple of years ago – any bug capable of lifting the equivalent of 60 tonnes has got to be worth time. click here

I’ve been doing what I do best and using even more rocks to create steps and improve the way up to the cabin.

Finally, to tie the title to the rest of this mundane prattle, here’s the day after the storm pictured above:

‘Still Life with Trees and Lake’

Whatever you are doing, enjoy life whilst you still can. Alan Fenn

'Burası Türkiye!' 'This is Turkey!'

Me Payamlı, You Jane!

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Our mountain plot is on the outskirts of our village in an area known locally as Payamlı (Pie-am-ler). Payam is the old name for the almond, badem in modern Turkish. The ‘lı’ bit on the end just means ‘with’ so Payamlı – with almonds. And with almonds we certainly are!

Yesterday friend Jane rang up about something totally unrelated but I was telling her about the almond blossom anyway. She got a little excited and wanted photos, then got mardy when she remembered that my phone hasn’t even got a camera let alone any ‘smarts’! So, using ‘other means’, here are some shoddy pics from my ancient compact camera to calm her down. The real thing is quite enchanting – like a pale pink haze over the whole area.

What is amazing is that, whilst there are a few cultivated areas planted up with almonds, the majority are just growing wild along the hedgerows and between the fields. Such is our delight in these beauties that we bought a couple today and planted them in our garden.

The thrill of arriving at our plot and immediately spotting that some of our very young trees are in leaf, in bud and in flower. J and I got a real kick out of that! In the main we haven’t a clue what we’ve planted, but with mixed nuts, raisins and assorted fruits our breakfasts are sorted!

So, Jane, this post is really for you. I hope it inspires you to drop by for a visit sometime soon. If you do it soon I won’t have to send more photos as the almonds turn more pink. That said, without television, what else would I be doing?

Alan Fenn, with Almonds up in the mountains.

Stuff

Loveliest Of Trees

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Alfred Edward Housman is, without doubt, my most cherished poet. He published only two books of poems, A Shropshire Lad and Last Poems and yet many of us know his beautiful, balanced, evocative verse without knowing anything about him.

Here his words that could apply to Syria or Afghanistan or Yemen or a child in Mosul whilst we are safe in our illusions:

They say my verse is sad: no wonder;

Its narrow measure spans

Tears of eternity, and sorrow,

Not mine, but man’s.

………….

This is for all ill-treated fellows

Unborn and unbegot,

For them to read when they are in trouble

And I am not.

. . and here on the beauty that surrounds us that we so often take for granted.

Loveliest of Trees

Loveliest of trees, the cherry now

Is hung with bloom along the bough,

And stands about the woodland ride

Wearing white for Eastertide.

 

Now, of my three score years and ten,

Twenty will not come again,

And take from seventy springs a score,

It only leaves me fifty more.

 

And since to look at things in bloom

Fifty springs are little room,

About the woodlands I will go

To see the cherry hung with snow.

Alan Fenn